Custom Muzzle Brakes

Built for any weapon, any caliber,

with proven results


Testing of the brake and the one mile shot

My Uncle and I took his rifle to the desert and with the brake installed the performance was outstanding


I’ve worked on a few designs of muzzle brakes and seeing what is currently on the market some are good, others useless, most are nothing more then stylish looking chunks of steel with a stylish price tag to match that offer little terms or actual reduction in recoil.


The example you’ll find below were all designed by myself and with the help of my Mechanical Engineer Uncle. All models have been tested and show significant reductions in recoil. They are also some what stylish but do not have the exorbitant price tag.

I will have all models available in 4140 Chromoly steel and in Stainless to match the finish of your rifle.


To start things off here is the flag ship model. It’s called the K&R 300 Ocotillo Special Yes it’s huge but it works extremely well

Designed for the larger calibers it is designed around the .338 Lapua and should not be mounted on anything less then the

.300 Winchester Magnum. With a 1.125” outside diameter and 5” long it is huge. The tapered end that seats on the muzzle is .950” and is the standard for most bull barrels but is large enough to be machined down to fit most heavy contour barrels. With fourteen .1875” wide slots and 72˚ of porting it will significantly reduce the felt recoil of your weapon.

An 11˚ face is machined in to give it that custom target crown look. Threaded 5/8” -24 RH, Exit hole machined .330” must be reamed for larger bullets. Custom diameters on request.

Not for use on anything larger then .416 Barrett

K&R 300 Ocotillo Special $249

Stainless or 4140





















































Muzzle brake in action at night

Perfect V pattern

This is shot from just behind and to the right of the shooter


This brake was tested with two very experienced shooters behind the weapon which was a heavy barrel Remington Sendero. Yes I may be bias on what this brake can do. I can tell you that shooting this rifle is very pleasant to shoot and feels like a heavy .308 or a heavy .30-06

I viewed this brake being shot and I can tell you there is no muzzel rise ZERO. Yep that’s right none. How can I make that claim??

Because when fired you can see the weapons recoil and the barrel is being pushed down INTO the bag we were shooting off of.

This brake works and maybe it works a little too well.


Testing

The .308 version i've personally tested on two rifles. The first being my Mk11(or what i call my Mk11) and the other is on my Remington 700 5R stainless. I can tell you for a fact that i can not really feel a change in felt recoil on the Mk11 and that is due to the weapons weight. It is a heavy rifle weighing in at 14lbs unloaded but I can get back on target fast enough to see my bullet splash at 850 meters.

No on the Rem 700 I can feel a significant reduction in felt recoil and muzzel jump. I typically shoot this rifle with the brake off because this is my 1000 yard rifle so switching to the brake you really notice it.. It goes from a .308 to a 7.62 x39mm in felt recoil



The K&R 556

The AR models below Threaded for 1/2” 28 RH threads common on all AR 15 style rifles. The Brake is 2.750” long .950” OD 11˚crown

.250” Exit hole. Exit hole must be reamed for use on other calibers. The face that meets the threaded shoulder is .740” to fit and blend on most AR style rifles. Brakes can be special ordered in 5/8”-24 for mounting on .308 and .300 Win Mag rifles.

We recommend .020” clearance when reaming to different calibers

K&R 556 $85

in 4140

or $130 in 416R stainless




























K&R .308 in 416 stainless

vertical ports shown

$199 Polished or blasted finish satin or flat


Vertically ported or V ported your choice

V porting give increased down force to prevent muzzel rise

Vertical porting provides greatist decrease in felt recoil with an increase in dB level

K.L.Stottlemyer & Co.

Toolmaker Extraordinaire

The difficultimmediately the impossible will take a little longer